Thanking our Police, Fire, and EMS
8/10/2018
Around the Community

 
 

We had a great time at the Franklin Park National Night Out. Thank you to everyone who came out and to our police, fire and EMS for all you do to keep our communities safe.
 
 

Thank you to everyone who braved the weather for our prescription take back and shredding event this week!
 
 
Slow Down for School Buses, Pedestrians
 

 
In the next few weeks, students will head back to class. Motorists, parents and children are encouraged to refresh their memories about how to share the road safely with school buses and other school transportation vehicles.

Pennsylvania law requires motorists stop at least 10 feet away from school buses when their red lights are flashing and their stop arm is extended. Motorists following or traveling alongside a school bus must also stop until the red lights have stopped flashing and the stop arm is withdrawn. Do not proceed until all the children have reached a place of safety. Penalties for failure to obey school bus safety laws can result in a $250 fine, five points on a driving record and a 60-day license suspension.

Parents are reminded to ensure that their children are at the bus stop early to avoid rushing. Students should stay where the bus driver can see them while boarding or exiting the bus.

Click here for more information and tips on school bus safety.
 
 
New Law to Better Protect Care-Dependent Individuals


A new law taking effect soon will better protect individuals who are dependent upon others for their care. Act 53 of 2018 will make it a crime to intentionally or recklessly endanger a care-dependent person – closing a gap in state law that exists between neglect and abuse. This addition to the Crimes Code includes neglect to provide care which causes a serious injury or death. This stems from a Bucks County case in which an elderly man was neglected so badly by four family caregivers his starvation led to septic shock.

The new law also adds abuse of a care-dependent person as a punishable offense – with the former law focusing only on neglect investigations – and expands the definition of a caretaker to include family members who should be held responsible. This law was necessary because some care-dependent people, who are among the most vulnerable groups of people in the state, were left without direct protections from the abuse and neglect by their caretakers.

The law allows the departments of Aging, Health and Human Services to report suspected abuse or neglect to district attorneys or the attorney general’s office. Penalties vary from a first-degree felony for death of a care-dependent person to a second-degree misdemeanor if a caretaker knowingly endangers a care-dependent person by failing to provide for his or her needs.
 
 
Serving Our Veterans
 
 
When our nation’s military men and women return home after service, they not only deserve our gratitude, but often times need our help. My district office in McCandless will be hosting veterans’ outreach hours on Friday, Aug. 24.

Openings are available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. by appointment only. Please call my office at 412-369-2230 to schedule an appointment.

During these special hours, a veteran’s outreach specialist will meet with local veterans and assist them with issues they may be having accessing benefits and services from the U.S. Veterans Administration.

It gives me great satisfaction to make programs available to our men and women who have served with such dignity. Veterans are a symbol of what makes our country great, and we must never forget all they have done to ensure our freedom.
For more information, contact my district office in McCandless at 125 Hillvue Lane, first floor, McCandless.
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