ConnectCard Registration at My District Office
8/16/2019
Register for Senior’s ConnectCard at My District Office


Our constituents can register for the Port Authority Senior Citizen ConnectCard at our main district office, located at 125 Hillvue Lane, First Floor, in McCandless. You can also call us at 412-369-2230.

The Senior Citizen ConnectCard permits adults age 65 or older to ride for free on Port Authority vehicles, including buses, light rail and inclines, during all hours of operation. The ConnectCard can be used with other transportation authorities across the Commonwealth by flashing the card to the operator.

It is important to bring valid proof-of-age documentation with you to our office. We will accept a photo driver’s license, PA ID card, passport, PACE ID card, armed forces discharge/separation papers or a birth certificate.

Seniors are reminded that their blue or yellow transit flash passes will continue to be accepted, but if you currently show the driver a Medicare card to ride public transit in Allegheny County or you will soon be turning 65, you will need to get a Senior ConnectCard before Jan. 1, 2020.
 
 
Making PA Schools Safer

Recognizing the importance of ensuring our children feel safe at school, the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly in support of investing an additional $60 million in the School Safety and Security Block Grant program.

Now in its second year, the program provides flexible funding that schools may use for a variety of security-related initiatives, including hiring school police officers, school resource officers, counselors and/or mental health counselors; alternative education and diversion programs; violence prevention initiatives; school safety and emergency preparedness plans; or physical upgrades to school buildings and equipment to improve safety.

Based on revisions to the grant funding guidelines, each school entity that submits an application for funding to the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency will receive a base grant of between $30,000 and $45,000, based on the school’s average daily attendance.

As part of the Public School Code bill that accompanied passage of this year’s budget, lawmakers also are requiring each public school district to create at least one multi-disciplinary threat assessment team to identify students in distress before their behavior escalates to a level that raises concern about safety.
 
 
Safe2Say Something Reporting System Gets Results


An anonymous reporting system designed to give students, teachers, parents and community members the ability to anonymously report potential threats and other problems has collected nearly 23,500 tips in its first six months of operation, according to a report from the Office of Attorney General.

The Safe2Say Something program, created by a 2018 law, launched in mid-January to give students a way to share information without fear of repercussions or blame from their peers.

Among the most common issues reported included bullying/cyber bullying; cutting/self-harm; suicide/suicide ideation; depression/anxiety; and drug use/distribution/possession.

To report a possible dangerous or violent situation, individuals can call the state tip line at 844-723-2729. Tips can also be reported to safe2saypa.org or through the Safe2Say app on iPhone and Android devices.
   
 
Slow Down for School Buses, Pedestrians


It’s hard to believe, but summer is coming to a close and this means students soon will head back to class. Motorists, parents and children are encouraged to be mindful about sharing the road safely with school buses and other school transportation vehicles.

Pennsylvania law requires motorists stop at least 10 feet away from school buses when their red lights are flashing and their stop arm is extended. Motorists following or traveling alongside a school bus must also stop until the red lights have stopped flashing and the stop arm is withdrawn.

Penalties for failure to obey school bus safety laws can result in a $250 fine, five points on a driving record and a 60-day license suspension.

Click here for more information and tips on school bus safety.
 
 
Get the Facts About Concussions


With many student athletes gearing up for fall sports practice, students, parents and coaches are reminded about ways to prevent, recognize and manage concussions.

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head, or from a fall or blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth. Concussions can have serious short-term and long-term impacts, especially on young people whose brains are still developing.

To protect students, the 2011 Safety in Youth Sports Act was passed to require all school entities to develop return-to-play policies for student athletes with concussions, as well as to require related training for coaches.

Visit the Department of Health’s website at health.pa.gov and search for “Traumatic Brain Injury” for approved curricula for coaches and other school personnel, along with frequently asked questions about the law and many other state-related resources.